Holograms: The Future of Touring

If you’ve purchased concert tickets in the last….decade…you know how expensive it can be, and that’s just talking about the ticket. Then factor in parking, concessions, or any merch you might want to grab to commemorate your experience, and you’re easily looking at a few hundred dollars. Scalpers and bots bulk buy tickets and resell at a much higher price. Artists have been known to hold on to the good seats for family and friends. Recently, Jay-Z came under fire after releasing his 4:44 album in which he talked about people getting their money right, then announcing high ticket prices for his show (they were starting at $200 if I remember correctly). The point is: in 2017, live music is a privilege, not a right.

Looking at this from another angle, we already CGI’d Paul Walker’s face on his brother after he passed away while in the middle of filming Furious 7. Did that ruin your ability to enjoy the movie? Think about it, after an artist has died, has your relationship with them actually changed?

If the artist is dead, touring is a major way for the estate to continue on the legacy and make money for the family, while allowing fans to continue to enjoy the music. For many, concert goers are attending for the energy of a live show, coming from both the band and the crowd. They’re there for the community experience. And if you’re not a die hard fan of the performer, chances are you’re buying tickets based on the price. Imagine how much cheaper it would be for hologram tickets: whether the artist is dead or alive.

It came as absolutely no shock to me when ABBA announced they’re doing a hologram tour.

“It’s perfect. We can be on stage while I’m home walking the dogs,” ABBA’s Benny Andersson, told the Herald Sun. “I don’t have to leave my house. If this really works there’ll be a lot of artists wanting to do the same thing, even artists who are still young and still touring. It’s a very interesting project.”

Let’s look at the Bruno Mars 24k Magic World Tour in Charlotte last week: general admission tickets were starting at $250. Unless you’re shelling out major coin to get the good GOOD seats, you’re most likely going to be watching the performance on a giant TV anyway. Wouldn’t you pay less to see his hologram?!

My opinion is this is a brilliant business decision, but how do you feel about it? Do you feel like you’re being cheated from the same quality of a show? Do you feel like it’s pointless to go through all the trouble just to see a hologram, even if it meant paying less? Or are you completely on board?!

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